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  • Writer's pictureNeal Heidt

8 Things that Wouldn’t be Possible 🤝 (Pt. 2)


A landscape plan for Blue Spruce Hideaway in Centennial, Colorado
A landscape plan for Blue Spruce Hideaway in Centennial, Colorado

Hi again,


A few minutes ago, I sent out the first half of this newsletter, sharing some of the ways we’ve been reflecting on trust so far in 2023 at Heidt and Depth. If you missed “8 Things that Wouldn’t be Possible, Part 1,” you can read it here. Without further ado, here is the rest of the story…


Example #5: A home that rocks


In April, we were hired by a couple in the Denver area to help them re-envision the lawn at their suburban home. The wife initially approached me with this request: “Can you help us figure out how to replace our lawn with rocks but make it look good?” (I’m paraphrasing.) As I got to know them through the project, I began to realize there was an underlying motive causing their request – a large water bill. Additionally, I also learned that they had the desires to contribute to both the aesthetic of their neighborhood and the experiences they share with their adult children.


An excerpt of an in-progress sketch of a water-saving, appealing, and hospitable front yard design
An excerpt of an in-progress sketch of a water-saving, appealing, and hospitable front yard design

At Heidt and Depth, we exist to do good for our clients’ communities through the ways we make places. While these homeowners initially approached me about solving a problem for them, they have trusted Heidt and Depth to further their thinking on this project by having a posture of openness. As a result, it has been exciting to watch as their minds have opened to the possibility that re-landscaping their yard could have the potential for such significant acts of service to others.


Example #6: A basement hideaway


In March, out of a desire to plant deep roots in south Denver, my wife and I decided to sell our house and buy a different one nearby. This one has a better floorplan and site plan for how we would like to raise our kids. There was one major problem in the house shopping process though: real estate prices in Denver are EXPENSIVE! This stresses me out. Real bad. And between the house situation and other things going on in my life, my anxiety began to overcome me. For the first time in my life, I began meeting with a therapist in May.


Through divine intervention, we were able to get a house that suits our projected needs at just above what we could afford on 1¼ incomes (I’m a stay-at-home parent when I’m not at Heidt and Depth). To help get our mortgage payments down to a manageable amount, we decided to open our basement to guests as a vacation rental (e.g. Airbnb, Vrbo, etc.). We are calling it Blue Spruce Hideaway.


A quiet, sunlit nook at Blue Spruce Hideaway in Centennial, Colorado
A quiet, sunlit nook at Blue Spruce Hideaway in Centennial, Colorado

When we started the process of setting up the space, we (1) had trouble finding contractors to help with the renovations and (2) began to realize the amount and thoroughness of building permits and red tape we’d have to navigate. Again, I began to encounter intense levels of stress about being able to afford a house in my own community – this time a house we had already moved into. However, in what I also chalk up as divine providence, we were able to find the path of least resistance on our applications and our permit for a short-term rental license was issued last week. Let me restate that: this is 2 months earlier than we were aiming for! Talk about something I’m kicking myself for – not trusting God as a hideaway from stress (more on this thought in Example #7).


Now we are burning the midnight oil on renovations to get the place open! Will the renovations be done before the original opening date? We’ll see!


Trying to come up with the perfect “blue spruce” color scheme for Blue Spruce Hideaway in Centennial, Colorado
Trying to come up with the perfect “blue spruce” color scheme for Blue Spruce Hideaway in Centennial, Colorado

Example #7: An open ear


I have to admit. Sometimes I get stuck wallowing in the thought that I’ve missed opportunities for success in my life. But in moments this year, a different train of thought has crossed my mind… “What if it’s not about me? What if God has positioned Heidt and Depth exactly where it needs to be? What if He’s only putting the opportunities on our plate that are right for us, and the right number of opportunities? And what if I’m not supposed to exhaust myself chasing anything more than that when it comes to business development?”


Despite an anxiety-inducing start to 2023 (more on that in Part 1), we’ve had the perfect amount of work on our plate. That being said, it is also very important for us to continue keeping an ear out for future opportunities that fit our vision and mission. I personally pray that God would steer us in the right direction so that the projects we assist with somehow bless somebody in the process (clients, collaborators, end users, etc.). That being said, we have a few leads for future projects on our plate. One project I am particularly excited for this fall is The Common Place Fund (a.k.a. CPF)…


Example #8: An initiative to make placemaking more common place


In July, Heidt and Depth opened an investment account with the National Christian Foundation for the exclusive purpose of creating charitable donations to placemaking work. Stay tuned to these newsletters and to our CPF webpage over the coming months to learn more about how CPF works and how to apply for this December’s grant.


We’re not only thankful for trust…


As always, thanks for your love and support for Heidt and Depth as we attempt to love and support others as well as possible.


Hope your weekend is off to a good start!


Neal Heidt

Placemaking Strategist | Heidt and Depth

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